Fuel your body for winter weather


Cottage cheese, eggs or kale can help you look and feel amazing

 

Introduction

You love it when the mercury dips low enough for you to break out your knee-high boots and sexy tights. But there’s nothing fun about chapped lips, lingering fatigue, and other cold weather bummers.

 

Cut them all off at the pass by filling your shopping cart with foods that will fight for your right to look and feel amazing. Researchers agree that these edibles have healing powers that can help keep you in top shape, inside and out. Start noshing on them now and your body will never suspect that it’s winter.

 

Your hair

Spoon up: low-fat cottage cheese

Hair is almost all protein, so attaining a strong, vibrant mane starts with eating enough of it. Reduced-fat cottage cheese is a protein heavyweight, with 14 grams in half a cup.

 

Pack: pumpkin seeds

Zinc helps reduce shedding, says Francesca Fusco, M.D., assistant clinical professor of dermatology at New York’s Mount Sinai Medical Center. Toss a tablespoon of these zinc-heavy seeds into your cereal.

 

Your brain

Surf for: Arctic char

This coldwater fish is a great source of the omega-3 fats DHA and EPA, which can improve brain function and ward off the blues, says Elizabeth Somer, R.D., author of “Age-Proof Your Body.” Omega-3s help squelch inflammation in the brain and regulate feel-good neurotransmitters. Sprinkle fillets with sea salt, ground pepper, and fresh lemon juice, then pan-fry on medium-high until one side is slightly brown. Flip and cook until the inside is slightly pink (6 to 8 minutes total).

 

Saute: kale

Feed the 100 billion neurons in your noggin with nutritious kale. A study in the journal Neurology reports that getting two-plus servings per day of veggies — especially leafy green ones like kale — slows cognitive decline by 40 percent. Temper kale’s bitter flavor by sautéing it lightly with 1 teaspoon of lemon juice, a chopped garlic clove, 2 tablespoons of pine nuts, and a pinch of salt.

 

Your brain

Surf for: Arctic char

This coldwater fish is a great source of the omega-3 fats DHA and EPA, which can improve brain function and ward off the blues, says Elizabeth Somer, R.D., author of “Age-Proof Your Body.” Omega-3s help squelch inflammation in the brain and regulate feel-good neurotransmitters. Sprinkle fillets with sea salt, ground pepper, and fresh lemon juice, then pan-fry on medium-high until one side is slightly brown. Flip and cook until the inside is slightly pink (6 to 8 minutes total).

 

Saute: kale

Feed the 100 billion neurons in your noggin with nutritious kale. A study in the journal Neurology reports that getting two-plus servings per day of veggies — especially leafy green ones like kale — slows cognitive decline by 40 percent. Temper kale’s bitter flavor by sautéing it lightly with 1 teaspoon of lemon juice, a chopped garlic clove, 2 tablespoons of pine nuts, and a pinch of salt.

 

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