A Health Drink for Your Teeth


Orange Juice

Which is better for your teeth — orange juice or tea?

Turns out that OJ ranks right up there with soda in terms of its enamel-damaging potential. But tea’s effect on teeth is like water’s: It leaves enamel unscathed.

 

Guard Your Teeth

Think of enamel as armor for your teeth. Once that armor gets worn down or damaged, it can’t repair itself. That’s why acidic beverages — soda, citrus juice, sports drinks — are so bad for your pearly whites: They contain enamel-stripping acids (phosphoric, citric, malic, and tartaric acids, to name a few). But green and black teas don’t attack enamel, and they even have a bit of tooth-friendly fluoride to boot.

 

Drinks That Do No Wrong

Save wear and tear on your teeth with these other smart sipping strategies:

 

Use a straw with acidic beverages. This minimizes contact with your teeth. Or swish your mouth with water afterward.

 

Drink brewed tea — and drink it straight up. If you load it up with sugar and lemon, your teeth will feel it.

 

Snack on natural stain removers, like apples, celery, and carrots.

 

You might want to skip the milk, too. Here’s why:

Women in a study who drank black tea had improved cardiovascular function — but that protection vanished if they drank it with milk. Temper the taste of your black tea with lemons instead. Or sip it as the Chinese traditionally do: straight up.

 

Researchers are not sure why milk may blunt tea’s heart-healthy effects, but milk proteins called caseins are possible culprits.

 

Bottoms up.

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