Monday Book Review: Season Of The Harvest


Season Of The Harvest (Harvest Trilogy, Book 1) by Michael R. Hicks

Amazon Book Description:

At a genetics lab where a revolutionary strain of corn is being developed, FBI Special Agent Jack Dawson’s best friend and fellow agent is brutally murdered, his body torn apart.

Jack is convinced that Naomi Perrault, a beautiful geneticist and suspected terrorist, is behind the murder. But when Jack is framed for setting off a bomb that devastates the FBI lab in Quantico, Naomi becomes Jack’s only hope of survival.

Confronted by the terrifying truth of what the genetically engineered seeds stolen by his friend are truly for and who is really behind them, Jack joins Naomi in a desperate fight across half the globe to save humanity from extermination…

My Review:

Although science fiction isn’t my favorite genre, Hicks’ take on big government, shadow organizations, secret alien agendas had intrigued me. I found the book as a freebie, as many authors do to garner readers. Slow to start but quickly gained steam as mysterious deaths happen and our main characters shoot off!

The characters are three dimensional, seen outside a job or story line itself. They have jobs, hobbies, we see their homes, Hicks does a great job with plot and characterization. No one character is overwhelming, all within standards of reality; no cartoon heroes or villains-very rare. There are some authors who write their heroes as more than human, either full of super-testosterone or so alpha that one cannot help but roll their eyes and skim over vast passages. Or, they are so wimpy you want to kill them yourselves.

The plot takes place all over the world, yet we fully believe we are right there with characters.  We feel the rush of adrenaline, our skin pricks with anticipation and our hearts, stop. What is even more believable is the genetically modified food supply, ripped right out of today’s headlines. In the book, we are blocked from knowing what is in the food supply and in reality, we are blocked from knowing what is in the food supply.  Is it for our own good, or someone elses?

A good action/mystery/thriller blurs the line from fiction to reality, as does A Season of the Harvest.  I give 4.5 stars.

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